056: What Employees Value Most in an Employer

What do you value in an employer?

I researched three online sites for this podcast. There are many similarities between these lists.

 

Zenefit.com

According to zenefit.com, the top 5 most important things employees look for are:

#1 – Company culture and mission

#2 – Approachable leadership

#3 – Opportunities for growth

#4 – Flexibility

#5 – Recognition

 

The Balance Careers

According to The Balance Careers, here are the top 7 things employees look for:

#1 – Competitive salary

#2 – Good benefit package

#3 – Flexible schedule

#4 – Opportunity to advance

#5 – Recognition

#6 – Effective management

#7 – Team atmosphere

 

High-Speed Training

The third source I used is High-Speed Training. Here are their top 6:

#1 – Fair salaries

#2 – Opportunities for personal development

#3 – Work/life balance

#4 – Recognition and a sense of purpose

#5 – Great company culture

#6 – Perks / benefits

-Medical/dental

-Sick leave

-Maternity/paternity leave

-Pensions

-Travel compensation

-Continuing education opportunities

 

What is this information telling us?

Here are my top 6 insights:

 

  1. Money isn’t everything.

 

  1. Company culture matters. A lot.

 

  1. People leave jobs most often because of their boss.

 

  1. Millennials don’t just want to know where they are going to start. They want to know where they can go.

 

  1. There is a wide range of perks and benefits available out there. Make sure you know the vocabulary and what’s most important to you.

 

  1. Recognition is important, and many companies do it poorly.

 

Interested in a deep dive with me? Register for my next webinar. In addition to great content, you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions and even get coached by me live! Here’s the link to find out about this month’s topic, date, and time: click here

 

 

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Leadership in Your First 90 Days

 You’ve landed your next great job.

It’s so important to establish your leadership approach from day one. Even before, if possible.

Step One is determining the organization’s culture, including readiness to change. You’ll likely see one of four readiness-to-change cultures:

Smooth Sailing

If the situation does not require urgent changes and the culture is ready to change, you can make minor changes over time. You have a great team that is willing to become even greater.

Often times, Smooth Sailing is occurring because the previous leader was outstanding, and there could be some resentment towards you as the new leader.

Your challenge is to not make waves right off the bat, and to not immediately undo what their previous leader did.

Unstable Calm

If the situation does not require urgent changes and the culture is not ready to change, make changes over time with a series of carefully thought-out minor “shocks.”

Think WIIFM (What’s In It For Me) as you shepherd your team through change, dangling a carrot or two as incentives for adapting to change.

Ready to Accelerate

If the situation does require urgent changes and the culture is ready to change, evolve quickly as a catalyst for change.

The biggest challenges in this situation: deciding which changes must occur, and in what order; moving as quickly as the situation requires. This is a situation where doing something, although perhaps not perfect, is better than non-action.

Facing Disaster

If the situation does require urgent changes and the culture is not ready to change, you must immediately shock the system for it to survive.

Many people won’t knowingly walk into this type of situation. People who do relish this role often see themselves as someone who can enter a dysfunctional situation, make widespread change, and exit  quickly (think Mary Poppins).

This may very well be a short-term role.

Next, let’s talk about your team. Your  goal should be to move every team member one step in the right direction.

Contributors

Contributors share your vision. They are often new to the organization and have more to gain by going forward.

Your strategy is to make the Contributors your champions. Give them leadership roles, committee assignments, and projects that allow them to sing your praises and those of your department.

Detractors

Detractors are comfortable with the status quo, are change resistant, and may see you as a threat to their value and power. They have often been in their position for a long time and see change as a threat.

Your strategy is to silence the Detractors’ whining and complaints…not in a spirit of “my way or the highway,” but rather to become better team players. If you can find a common middle ground with them, they may keep their mouths shut.

Watchers

The Watchers—often the silent majority—will sit on the fence and see which way the herd’s moving.

Your strategy is to move the Watchers towards feeling more positive about their work environment and you.

Make small deposits in their emotional bank account and eventually you’ll have a respectable balance.

How do you move every person one step in the right direction? Increase the positive consequences of good behaviors and the negative consequences of bad behaviors

Conversely, decrease the negative consequences of good behaviors and the positive consequences of bad behaviors.

Interested in a deep dive with me? Register for my next webinar. In addition to great content, you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions and even get coached by me live! Here’s the link to find out about this month’s topic, date, and time: click here

 

 

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What’s Your Leadership Personality?

Leadership by Personality, using MBTI personality types

I had the privilege of conducting training for a delightful team last week. They served the Latin American market of their global beverage company.

Didn’t hurt that the meeting was at Disney World.

We used the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to facilitate team-building, open the lines of communication, and create cohesion.

We also talked about the leadership strengths – and weaknesses – of each personality type.

Point #1: Everyone has the capacity to be a leader.

Point #2: How that leadership manifests itself will vary widely depending on the leader’s personality type.

Point #3: A leader’s time is best spent focusing on his/her strengths, while minimizing the impact of his or her weaknesses.

Let’s take a look at a couple of personality types; I will “coach” these leaders based on their personality type.

Joe (ENTJ) – Extraversion, Intuition, Thinking, Judging

Joe’s a natural leader – in command, charismatic, visionary, action- and results-oriented. Joes’ team respects him and would take a bullet for him.

Joe’s leadership weakness? He sometimes steamrolls his team, making decisions quickly without taking into consideration the human impact of his decisions. Some of his team members don’t feel comfortable questioning Joe’s decisions, or even speaking up in staff meetings. They also don’t always feel their efforts are acknowledged, or appreciated.

Coach Lesa: I would take a two-pronged approach to working with Joe. We would focus on Joe’s ability to seek (and consider) feedback from his team; specific behaviors Joe could use to engage his team in the decision-making process.

I would also encourage Joe to seek help from a team member who can serve as a “translator” between Joe and his team, most likely someone with a preference for Feeling. This person must have permission to be completely open and honest with Joe, helping him be more aware of the potential impact of his quick, bottom-line-focused decisions.

Sandy (ISFP) – Introversion, Sensing, Feeling, Perceiving

Sandy is all about personal loyalty, harmony, and team work. She has a very low need to lead or control others, and works to ensure her team members’ well-being. Her high-achieving team members love how she trusts them to do their work with no hint of micro-management.

Sandy’s leadership weakness shows up in under-performing team members who need more supervision and structure than Sandy prefers to give. Further, Sandy avoids conflict and avoids giving critical feedback to these team members. Not addressing, and correcting, unacceptable behaviors has a demoralizing effect on the entire team.

Coach Lesa: In a similar two-pronged approach, I would work with Sandy to step outside her comfort zone to provide the under-performers with much-needed feedback. We’d work on changing her thoughts around giving critical feedback; we’d also talk about the effect this is having on her high-achievers.

If Sandy is in a position to have an assistant manager or other key report who can support her in this, I’d love to see Sandy learn from someone who is strong in providing critical feedback and comfortable in addressing performance issues head-on.

I hope this has given you a flavor of how different personality types approach leadership, how to capitalize on their strengths, and how to address weaknesses.

One last note: The best leaders resist the temptation to hire “mini-me’s,” instead opting for people whose strengths and weaknesses are complimentary to their own. This ensures the team will have better balance and is likely to perform at a higher level.

Happy Leading!

Interested in a deep dive with me? Register for my next webinar. In addition to great content, you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions and even get coached by me live! Here’s the link to find out about this month’s topic, date, and time: click here

 

 

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Change Really IS Good: Lessons from the Other Side

I changed my business name last week.

The reason? My old business name, LEK Executive Consultants, didn’t effectively convey what I do.

My business name is now Exclusive Career Coaching. I’ve completely revamped my website and materials, created a new logo, notified my mailing list…I even changed my voice message yesterday.

Still to do? Lots…I’m updating LinkedIn and Facebook, and I’ll order new business cards soon.

I’ve learned so much over the past seven days; I’ve had great breakthroughs, a few tears, and raised my voice more than once (at my computer).

I want to share what I’ve learned with you, in hopes that it will either encourage you to make a much-needed change, or help you through a change you’re in the midst of.

5. Ask for help.

I was fortunate to get help from an absolutely fabulous digital marketer. I got the most amazing insights from her on my current digital footprint as well as guidelines for increasing that footprint in ways that will best serve my business.

She also provided me with invaluable insight into what factors to consider in renaming my company.

Whether you are an entrepreneur or working for someone else, one of the marks of a great leader is to recognize what you don’t know and get the help you need.

4. Don’t ask for help.

I chose to completely overhaul my website myself, and I couldn’t be happier with that decision. Not only in terms of the result I achieved, but also the sense of accomplishment I got from figuring out how to do it.

It also forced me to really think through my messaging and presentation on such a granular level – much more so than had I hired someone to do this for me.

Get out of your rut and surprise yourself – by learning a new skill or taking on a task you have always delegated. As my favorite life coach, Brooke Castillo, would say, “Blow your own mind.”

3. Be afraid.

Change can be a good thing. It’s easy to stay where you are; change means fear. If you’re not at least a little bit afraid, you aren’t dreaming big enough or reaching far enough.

The trick is to embrace that fear – recognize it as your primitive brain, trying to protect you from mastodons. Thank it for its concern, then do it anyway.

2. Don’t expect it to be easy.

Change will take more time, more money, and be more frustrating that you could have ever imagined.

Take breaks when you feel the frustration rising up (so your neighbors don’t have to hear you scream at your computer like mine did).

Half the battle here is setting appropriate expectations from the outset.

1. Recognize – and reward – your progress.

Many people wait until the job is done to reward themselves. I’ve made a point of recognizing my achievements each day.

I’ve also shared my progress with those around me – and with you folks, in this blog. Not to toot my horn, but in hopes it will encourage someone else.

Interested in a deep dive with me? Register for my next webinar. In addition to great content, you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions and even get coached by me live! Here’s the link to find out about this month’s topic, date, and time: click here

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