056: What Employees Value Most in an Employer

What do you value in an employer?

I researched three online sites for this podcast. There are many similarities between these lists.

 

Zenefit.com

According to zenefit.com, the top 5 most important things employees look for are:

#1 – Company culture and mission

#2 – Approachable leadership

#3 – Opportunities for growth

#4 – Flexibility

#5 – Recognition

 

The Balance Careers

According to The Balance Careers, here are the top 7 things employees look for:

#1 – Competitive salary

#2 – Good benefit package

#3 – Flexible schedule

#4 – Opportunity to advance

#5 – Recognition

#6 – Effective management

#7 – Team atmosphere

 

High-Speed Training

The third source I used is High-Speed Training. Here are their top 6:

#1 – Fair salaries

#2 – Opportunities for personal development

#3 – Work/life balance

#4 – Recognition and a sense of purpose

#5 – Great company culture

#6 – Perks / benefits

-Medical/dental

-Sick leave

-Maternity/paternity leave

-Pensions

-Travel compensation

-Continuing education opportunities

 

What is this information telling us?

Here are my top 6 insights:

 

  1. Money isn’t everything.

 

  1. Company culture matters. A lot.

 

  1. People leave jobs most often because of their boss.

 

  1. Millennials don’t just want to know where they are going to start. They want to know where they can go.

 

  1. There is a wide range of perks and benefits available out there. Make sure you know the vocabulary and what’s most important to you.

 

  1. Recognition is important, and many companies do it poorly.

 

Interested in a deep dive with me? Register for my next webinar. In addition to great content, you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions and even get coached by me live! Here’s the link to find out about this month’s topic, date, and time: click here

 

 

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Ways to Restore Equilibrium When Work is a B****h

Someone asks you how work is going. You roll your eyes, make a farm animal-like sound, and feel yourself gearing up for a diatribe.

Even if you love your job, there will be rough times. Times when the thought of going into work brings dread. Long hours, working weekends, and doing tasks that don’t play to your strengths.

In other blogs, I’ve talked about how to change your thinking so you’re getting the results you want at work no matter the circumstances. Today, let’s talk about how to get back to normal when things at work aren’t, so you aren’t damaging your evenings and weekends (and alienating friends and family).

For the purposes of this article, I’m focusing on what you can do outside of work, rather than changing what is happening at work.

Make physical activity a priority

For some reason, when we’re overworked one of the first things we take off our “to-do” list is exercise.

If you have to let some things go in your personal life during a stressful time at work, there are two things you MUST keep as priorities, and one of them is physical activity.

What can you do that you a) enjoy, and b) will give you the biggest bang in the shortest amount of time?

Get sufficient sleep

This is the other priority you MUST keep, no matter what is happening at work.

You KNOW you can’t possibly give your best effort at work if you are sleep-deprived. Further, your family and friends aren’t going to want to hang around you if you’re only half-awake.

Set a personal goal

Having a goal that has nothing to do with work can be a powerful motivator to make the best use of your non-work hours.

Do you want to train for a half-marathon, learn a foreign language, or hone your painting skills?

Identify something you’re passionate about and give it a regular slot in your schedule.

Cultivate your relationships

When you’re in a stressful period at work, it can be easy to forego plans with friends and family. It can also be difficult to initiate such plans if you’re afraid you’ll have to bail at the 11th hour.

The key here is to go for quality over quantity. You might not be able to set three or four social engagements during a stressful week at work, but can you schedule one? Or do you have a friend or loved one who is game for a last-minute activity when you find yourself with an unexpected open block of time?

Let go of the unimportant

When your personal time is limited, this presents a great opportunity to eliminate the unnecessary and inconsequential from your life.

What can you stop doing? What can you hire someone else to do, such as cleaning or yard work? Are there relationships in your life that no longer serve you? Can you create personal time by having groceries delivered or purchasing pre-made meals? Could you turn off the t.v. in favor of a workout or visiting with a friend?

Look at your daily and weekly activities with a critical eye, and eliminate or minimize those that aren’t enjoyable for you.

Ask for help

Let those closest to you know what’s going on at work, how long you expect it to continue, and ask for their help. Parents, a spouse or significant other, and your closest friends might be able to pitch in with such things as shopping, childcare, and simple errands.

Don’t suffer in silence! “No one can fill those of our needs that we don’t let show,” says the classic song “Lean on Me.” So true.

 

Interested in a deep dive with me? Register for my next webinar. In addition to great content, you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions and even get coached by me live! Here’s the link to find out about this month’s topic, date, and time: click here

To listen to this week’s podcast, “Work/Life Blend (Balance is a Myth)” click here:

050: Work/Life Blend (Balance is a Myth)

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050: Work/Life Blend (Balance is a Myth)

Why Work/Life Balance is a Myth

Think about it: Work/Life balance, to me, is like Work is on one side of a teeter-totter, and Life is on the other side.

When one side of the teeter-totter gets “heavier,” meaning you spend more of your time and attention on it, the other side gets “lighter,” meaning you spend less time and attention on it.

In other words, focusing on Work is at the expense of your Life, and focusing on your Life is at the expense of your Work.

I don’t think this model serves anyone.

Rather, think of Work/Life blend, meaning a delicious mixture of both where the Work ingredients are indistinguishable from the Life ingredients.

Sometimes your recipe calls for a bit more Work. Sometimes your recipe calls for a bit more Life.

You always have a choice when it comes to what you put into your mixture. You may think you don’t, but I promise you do.

When Work Takes Up More of the Recipe

For example, let’s imagine you’ve just gotten a promotion. There’s a fairly steep learning curve for your new job, and you’re under the gun from day one to get a major project completed on time.

It may FEEL like your recipe will be all Work and no Life. But you actually have options.

You could:

-Turn the promotion down

-Negotiate with your new boss for help with the project

-Look for a new job that won’t require as much of your time and attention

-Seek help with aspects of your Life you can delegate, such as housecleaning, grocery shopping, and errands, so you can focus as much time as you need to on your new job

-Eliminate some time-stealers from your personal life in favor of engaging in more meaningful activities

When Life Takes Up More of the Recipe

Let’s imagine one of your parents has just been given a terminal diagnosis, and you are the person to take care of your parent during the illness.

You could:

-Seek help with your parent from other family members or close friends

-Seek a facility that will provide your parent with needed care

-Quit your job so you can focus entirely on your parent

-Ask for a leave of absence from your job

-Speak with your boss about sharing some of your workload with others

There are probably many more options you might consider. The point is, you have options, and it doesn’t serve you to think “I’m trapped,” or “How am I going to manage this?”

Particularly in times when one area of your life is “heavy,” it’s a good idea to set goals for the other area of your life so you’re getting maximum bang for your buck.

Think of it this way: What one ingredient can I put in my mixture that will make the most impact?

How to Make the Most of the Time You Are at Work

-Complete something you’ve been working on a long time

-Organize your physical space and/or computer files

-Get on a committee/project that won’t take a tremendous amount of your time, but will have a high return for your professional reputation and career

-Go deep with the aspect of your job you most enjoy…perhaps it’s creativity, analytical, organizing…

-Take a critical look at what you are currently doing: What can be eliminated? What can be put on the back burner? What can be delegated?

How to Make the Most of the Time You AREN’T at Work

-Make time for exercise. What can you eliminate from your Life to make this a priority? Is there a different type of exercise or way of exercising you could use during this time?

-Look for time wasters, such as watching t.v., and replace them with more satisfying activities.

-Make sure you’re getting enough sleep.

-Get creative with your meals to eliminate time spent in preparation, without sacrificing food quality. Especially during this time, you need your nutrition to support you.

-What activity restores your equilibrium? Here are some possibilities;

-Reading

-Cooking

-Crafting

-Getting out in nature

-Spending time with friends/family

-Learning (something that has nothing to do with work)

-Writing

-Making art or music

The bottom line, then, is to make sure your ingredients are meaningful to you. When you have less time to spend on Life, make sure the time you do spend gives you the greatest ROI. When work has to be diminished because of things going on in your personal life, make sure you’re focused on the most important aspects of your job…and be willing to put others on the back burner.

Interested in a deep dive with me? Register for my next webinar. In addition to great content, you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions and even get coached by me live! Here’s the link to find out about this month’s topic, date, and time: click here

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